The Breed

September 4, 2009 at 1:06 am (Guests, Sites, or Books, I Recommend) ()

One of my favorite TV shows was Highlander starring Adrian Paul, so when a vampire movie starring him came out, I had to watch it.

The Breed is a very different vampire movie. It reminded me of the first movie of Alien Nation where two cops of different races are thrown together, distrusting each other at the onset, they learn to co-operate and come to respect each other. In this world, supposedly the future, but quite a strange future, that is almost Nazi or maybe behind the Iron Curtain, with WWII clothes, cars, propaganda blaring, vampires have come out of the closet. Now a vampire killer threatens to ignite the world in fear and paranoia. Two cops must track down the killer before chaos can erupt.

Adrian Paul makes for a dark, brooding, overly controlled, complex vampire, an ex-Jew whose family was killed by the Nazis. He plays the role well, if a little too dead.The other vampires are more interesting, more dark and sinister. And the humans almost stereotypical stupid and afraid.

It is a story of fear and prejudice, Jews, Negroes, with an unrealistically happy ending. But I did enjoy it very much, as much for its differences, for it is certainly different from the normal vampire fare.

THE BREED

Release Date: 2001
Cast: Adrian Paul, Bai Ling, Bokeem Woodbine, Zen Gesner
Director: Michael Oblowitz

First reviewed by Linda Suzane, April 11, 2002 http://www.midnightblood.com

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2 Comments

  1. Frances said,

    Adrian Paul gives a wonderful performance in this film. In fact, he said recently that the vampire Aaron Grey is one of his top five favourite characters of all the characters he has portrayed in his career.

  2. Patricia Stoltey said,

    Now this one sounds as if it has enough underlying story and parallels to the human experience to be interesting even to a non-vampire lover like me. Reminds me of the kind of sci fi I like — District 9 was an excellent example because of the setting in South Africa and the parallels drawn to apartheid.

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